ADD/ADHD

We all know children who can’t sit still, who never seem to listen, who don’t follow instructions no matter how clearly you present them, or who blurt out inappropriate comments at inappropriate times. Sometimes these children are labeled as troublemakers, or criticized for being lazy and undisciplined. However, they may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), formerly known as attention deficit disorder, or ADD. ADHD makes it difficult for people to inhibit their spontaneous responses—responses that can involve everything from movement to speech to attentiveness.

Because we expect very young children to be easily distractible and hyperactive, it’s the impulsive behaviors—the dangerous climb, the blurted insult—that often stand out in preschoolers with ADHD. By age four or five, though, most children have learned how to pay attention to others, to sit quietly when instructed to, and not to say everything that pops into their heads. So by the time children reach school age, those with ADHD stand out in all three behaviors: inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

The signs and symptoms of ADHD typically appear before the age of seven. However, it can be difficult to distinguish between attention deficit disorder and normal “kid behavior.” The three primary characteristics of ADHD are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. The signs and symptoms a child with attention deficit disorder has depends on which characteristics predominate.

Children who only have inattentive symptoms of ADHD are often overlooked, since they’re not disruptive. However, the symptoms of inattention have consequences: getting in trouble with parents and teachers for not following directions; underperforming in school; or clashing with other kids over not playing by the rules.

It isn’t that children with ADHD can’t pay attention: when they’re doing things they enjoy or hearing about topics in which they’re interested, they have no trouble focusing and staying on task. But when the task is repetitive or boring, they quickly tune out.

Staying on track is another common problem. Children with ADHD often bounce from task to task without completing any of them, or skip necessary steps in procedures. Organizing their schoolwork and their time is harder for them than it is for most children. They may also have trouble concentrating if there are things going on around them; they usually need a calm, quiet environment in order to stay focused.

Recent surveys show that approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) have been diagnosed with ADHD as of 2011. While there is no general consensus regarding the cause of ADD/ADHD several studies have linked the disorder to prenatal and postnatal mercury exposure. To learn more please see the additional resource/research tabs below.

Related Resources

Prenatal exposure to mercury and fish consumption during pregnancy and ADHD-related behavior in children: Childhood behavioral disorders are increasingly prevalent and result in substantial costs to families and society, with impacts on the educational system, quality of life and often on productivity into adulthood.1 ADHD is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, affecting 8-12% of children worldwide2, yet the etiology is not well understood.3, 4 Increasing evidence supports associations between metals and ADHD-related behaviors, including prenatal and postnatal lead exposures.5-7

Campaign to Restore Child Health: ADHD & Vaccine Injury

ADD/ADHD is in every classroom in America. Recent statistics show that it affects almost 11% of children. Each day, children, their parents and teachers struggle with symptoms. There are few answers in mainstream medicine. Often, the medications suggested are dangerous with a long list of undesirable side effects. Treatments outside of the mainstream are often unattainable and expensive.  Here is Allie’s story.

What’s your child’s story? Make a video and hashtag it #restorechildhealth and #worldmercuryproject.

Prenatal exposure to mercury and fish consumption during pregnancy and ADHD-related behavior in children

Childhood behavioral disorders are increasingly prevalent and result in substantial costs to families and society, with impacts on the educational system, quality of life and often on productivity into adulthood. ADHD is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, affecting 8-12% of children worldwide, yet the etiology is not well understood.3, 4 Increasing evidence supports associations between metals and ADHD-related behaviors, including prenatal and postnatal lead exposures.

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